Remain active and visible to recruiters

Thank you for your interest in Avjobs, Inc. Due to the overwhelming amount of resumes we receive we have implemented an online application process to help us manage and track all applicants interested in employment within the industry. This system allows us to keep all applicants organized while maximizing the applicant's visibility to our recruiters. You will need to visit our website, (www.avjobs.com), to apply for positions you are interested in. Please be aware that you will not be considered for any positions in our system until you have applied via our applicant website. Additionally, completing your online job application in our system will allow you to keep us updated in your career progress and it will also ensure your resume and interest will remain active and visible to our recruiters.

Please visit www.avjobs.com and register for our Applicant Portal.  From there, first complete the online job application and follow the instructions for the jobs an companies you are interested in. After completing the online job application and submitting your online application for the jobs you are interested in, please remember your login (email) and password for returning to our site.

Thank you again for your interest in AVJOBS, Inc.

Airlines and the Environment

Fuel Efficiency
Fuel is the airline industry's second largest expense, exceeded only by labor. The major U.S. airlines spend more than $10 billion a year on fuel, which is approximately 10 percent of total operating expenses. As a result, increased fuel efficiency has been a top industry priority for many years, and the industry has made giant strides in that regard. Since deregulation, U.S. airlines have increased fuel efficiency nearly 65 percent by:

  • investing in new, environmentally efficient aircraft and engines;
  • lowering cruising speeds;
  • using computers to determine optimum fuel loads and to select altitudes and routes that minimize fuel burn;
    using flight simulators rather than real aircraft for pilot training;
  • holding aircraft at gates, with engines shut down, when weather or other problems delay takeoff, when appropriate;
  • using only one engine to taxi;
  • keeping aircraft exteriors clean to minimize aerodynamic drag.

Most important, the airlines have invested, and continue to invest, billions of dollars in new aircraft and engines that are far more efficient than the models they replace. The Airbus A320 and Boeing 737-300, for example, transport twice as many revenue passenger miles per gallon of fuel than the DC-9 and earlier versions of the 737. In addition, they emit smaller amounts of the gases of concern to scientists studying global warming and other environmental issues.
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Flight Engineer or Second Officer Jobs

In Flight - Pilot  Flight Engineer or Second Officer
General Information

For many pilots both professional and recreational, the ultimate job is to be an airline captain. Most airline pilots start out as first officer (co-pilot) with a regional carrier. When they join a major airline, their first position may not be as a pilot, but as a flight engineer.

Other piloting jobs include flight instructor, corporate pilot, charter pilot, test pilot, and agricultural pilot. Many people enjoy these kinds of flying - each with its own set of challenges and rewards - and wouldn't think of trading their jobs for that of airline pilot.

While the various kinds of piloting jobs involve a variety of special circumstances, there are a number of conditions that are common to all pilots. All pilots flying for hire have progressed through a flight training program and have earned a commercial pilot's license or an airline transport rating. Most likely they will also have one or more advanced ratings such as instrument, multi-engine or aircraft type ratings depending upon the requirements of their particular flying jobs. more >>

History and Mission

http://www.egos-school.com/trades/public/StartPage - Thumbnails by Thumbshots.orgSince 1948, Emily Griffith Opportunity School has prepared students for employment for the general and commercial aviation industry. Originally located at Columbine Airfield and then Stapleton International Airport, students trained to meet the rigorous and challenging airframe and powerplant (A&P) requirements to take the FAA examinations for their A&P certifications. To continue to meet today's demanding standards for qualified aircraft technicians, Emily Griffith Opportunity School has recently completed a new multi-million dollar educational facility at Front Range Airport. This new state-of-the-art facility in Watkins, Colorado provides students hands-on training using operational-ready aircraft. It is our mission to prepare students not only for today but for the future. more>>

Structure of the Airline Industry

U.S. scheduled airlines are classified by the government on the basis of the amount of revenue generated from operations. These classifications are major, national and regional.

All airlines hold two certificates from the federal government: a fitness certificate and an operating certificate. The Department of Transportation (DOT) issues fitness certificates - called certificates of public convenience and necessity - under it's statutory authority. Basically, the certificate establishes that the carrier has the financing and the management in place to provide scheduled service. The certificate typically authorizes both passenger and cargo service. Some airlines, however, obtain only cargo-service authority. Commuter airlines that use aircraft with a seating capacity of 60 or fewer seats or a maximum payload capacity of no more than 18,000 pounds can operate under the alternative authority of Part 298 of DOT's economic regulations.

Operating certificates, on the other hand, are issued by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) under Part 121 of the Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs), which spell out numerous requirements for operating aircraft with 10 or more seats. The requirements cover such things as the training of flight crews and aircraft maintenance programs. All majors, nationals and regionals operate with a Part 121 certificate. more >>