Aviation Industry Forecast Fiscal Years 2013-2033

Aviation Industry Forecast Fiscal Years 2013-2033

Since the beginning of the century, the commercial air carrier industry has suffered several major shocks that have led to reduced demand for air travel. These shocks include the terror attacks of September 11, skyrocketing prices for fuel, debt restructuring in Europe and the United States (U.S.), and a global recession. To manage this period of extreme volatility, air carriers have fine-tuned their business models with the aim of minimizing financial losses by lowering operating costs, eliminating unprofitable routes and grounding older, less fuel efficient aircraft. To increase operating revenues, carriers have initiated new services that customers are willing to purchase. Carriers have also started charging separately for services that were historically bundled in the price of a ticket. The capacity discipline exhibited by carriers and their focus on additional revenue streams bolstered the industry to profitability in 2012 for the third consecutive year. Going into the next decade, there is cautious optimism that the industry has been transformed from that of a boom-to-bust cycle to one of sustainable profits.

As the economy recovers from the most serious economic downturn and slow recovery in recent history, aviation will continue to grow over the long run. Fundamentally, demand for aviation is driven by economic activity. As the economy returns to growth, so will aviation. The 2013 FAA forecast calls for U.S. carrier passenger growth over the next 20 years to average 2.2 percent per year, compared to last year’s forecast growth of 2.6 percent per year. After another year of slow or no growth this year, growth over the next five years will be slightly higher than the long run rate as we assume the U.S. economy grows at a faster rate. This delayed trajectory represents the downward adjustments of the overall economy, here in the U.S. and abroad, and of the aviation sector response. One of the many factors influencing the delayed recovery is the uncertainty that surrounds the U.S. and European economies. The latter, primarily those belonging to the Euro area, have been hit hard by the pressure for fiscal austerity. Combined with the slow pace of these economies, debt restructuring pulled the European economy into recession in early 2012, where it continues to languish today. This has not helped the pace of U.S. economic growth given the importance of its trade with Europe. Despite this and the ambiguity surrounding its own fiscal imbalances, the U.S. economy has managed to avoid a double dip recession and trudges along the path of slow recovery.

System capacity in available seat miles (ASMs) – the overall yardstick for how busy aviation is both domestically and internationally – is projected to shrink by 0.1 percent this year after posting a 0.1 percent increase in 2012; it will then grow at an average annual rate of 2.9 percent through 2033. In the domestic market, capacity growth hovers around zero for the second year in a row. Domestic capacity is projected to grow at an average annual rate of 2.1 percent for the remainder of the forecast period. Domestic mainline carrier capacity will not increase in 2013 after increasing 0.7 percent in 2012. For the regional carriers, domestic capacity growth is also projected to be flat in 2013 after declining 4.3 percent in 2012. Commercial air carrier domestic revenue passenger miles (RPMs) are forecast to increase 0.7 percent in 2013, and then grow at an average of 2.2 percent per year through 2033; domestic enplanements in 2013 will decrease 0.1 percent, and then grow at an average annual rate of 2.0 percent for the remainder of the forecast.

The average size of domestic aircraft is expected to increase by 0.4 seats in FY 2013 to 124.3 seats. Average seats per aircraft for mainline carriers are projected to stay relatively flat as network carriers continue to reconfigure their domestic fleets. While demand for 70-90 seat aircraft continues to increase, we expect the number of 50 seat regional jets in service to fall, increasing the average regional aircraft size in 2013 by 0.5 seats to 57.7 seats per mile. Passenger trip length in domestic markets will increase by 7.2 miles during the same period.

Although the slow growth of the U.S. economy and the European recession has dampened the near term prospects for general aviation, the long-term outlook remains favorable. We see growth in business aviation demand over the long term driven by a growing U.S. and world economy especially in the turbo jet, turboprop and turbine rotorcraft markets. As the fleet grows, the number of general aviation hours flown is projected to increase an average of 1.5 percent a year through 2033.

The global economy is facing a prospect of slow growth in 2013 with continued recession in the first part of the year in Europe which has slowed the demand for air travel. Profitability for U.S. carriers will hinge on a stable environment for fuel prices, an increase in demand for corporate air travel, maintaining the ability to pass along fare increases to leisure travelers, and the continual generation of ancillary revenues. To navigate this volatile operating environment, mainline carriers will continue to drive down costs by better matching flight frequencies and/or aircraft gauge with demand, delaying deliveries of newer aircraft and/or grounding older aircraft, along with pressuring regional affiliates to accept lower fees for contract flying. Over the long term, we see a competitive and profitable aviation industry characterized by increasing demand for air travel and airfares growing more slowly than inflation, reflecting over the long term a growing U.S. economy.

Data cited Alaska Airlines, American Airlines, United-Continental Airlines, Delta Airlines, and U.S. Airways.

Handeling Rejection During Job Search

Handeling Rejection During Job Search

You may have responsed to many job postings, sent your resume to employers, completed many online applicantions and spent time interviewing to no avail.  It is important to learn from those experiences to better yourself for next time.  Rejection is an important part of the interview process and you can’t take it personally.  Instead, accept it and reflect upon your approach to see if there are positive changes you can make for the next go around.

  • Ask yourself what you could have done differently, how you could have handeled yourself differently, how you could have prepared differently etc.
  • Work on any questions that you had difficulty answering
  • Did you provide too much or too little information on any particular questions?
  • Did you do research on the company before you interviewed?
  • Could you have asked better or more appropirate questions with regard to the vacancy or the company?

Make note of what you learned from your own self assessment for reference.  It’s important that you use this renewed energy to keep moving forward and ace the next interview.

Additional Resources:
Handling the Stress of the Job Search
Aviation Job Search Tips

$25 in FREE Clicks from Aviation Ad Network to your Website

Advertise with Us$25 in FREE Clicks from Aviation Ad Network to your Website

Millions of shoppers are only a click away!  Let us drive traffic to your website.

Aviation Ad Network is a highly targeted pay-per-click advertising program that puts your products in front of millions of aviation customers.  Customers who click your ads are taken directly to your website to make a purchase.

When you open a new advertiser account, use Promotion Code: AVADGO25

Click Here to Appear on Aviation Ad Network!

Shoppers Click to Product Pages on Your Website
When shoppers click on an ad for your product, they will click through to the product page on your website.

You Are Charged a Cost-Per-Click
You only pay when a shopper clicks your ad and is sent to your website. The amount charged is based on your bid. Your bids are automatically set to the minimum for each bidding category. For optimal ad placement, set your bids to the highest amount you are willing to pay for a click.

Shoppers Purchase Products from Your Website
You control the branding and purchase experience on your website. Shoppers who purchase from you directly become a part of your customer base.

With Aviation Ad Network, you can reach engaged shoppers on your website, acquire new customers, and increase sales.

Click Here to Appear on Aviation Ad Network!

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How to save your Resume as PDF in Microsoft Word

This information also applies to Microsoft Word 2003 and newer.

If you have a Resume prepared with Microsoft Office and you want (or need) to share with others but do not want them to change the format, you may want to save it as a PDF. PDF files also preserve formatting when printing, so you can feel comfortable that your Resume looks exactly the way you want it to look.

Adobe Acrobat can cost around $300, and if you only need it for 1 or 2 documents, that can be kind of spendy. With this little secret, you can quickly and easily save your Microsoft Word Resume as a PDF document is just a few steps.

  1. First open your resume in Word
  2. Next, Click the "File" tab or the "File" pull-down menu and select "Save As"
  3. After clicking "Save As you should see the following dialogue box (or something very similar)
  4. Select the "Save as Type" pull down, and choose the "PDF (*.pdf)" option
  5. In the File Name box, enter a name for your Resume, if you haven't already
  6. Click "Save" and you're done

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES:
2007 Microsoft Office Add-in: Microsoft Save as PDF or XPS
http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=7

If you have a Microsoft Office file that you want to share with others but do not want them to change the format, you may want to save the file as a PDF.
Save as PDF
http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/word-help/save-as-pdf-HA010064992.aspx

How to save to the PDF format in Microsoft Word 2013
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ub2fqhKm-8

Adobe Acrobat
http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat.html

General Aviation Mind Tricks

We recently had a chance to visit this website with some pretty good little tricks for general aviation pilots.

We all know it is very easy to make a mistake in aviation when numbers are involved. Todays flight computers and glass cockpits provide us with a plethora of numbers to help us do our job, and provided we are able to cross check them, this is quite useful. When it is not so useful is when the numbers are wrong due to a wrong entry or malfunction and we don't recognize the problem.

This website is a collection of mental math tricks to get a rough answer while flying and to crosscheck the answers given by a flight computer or GPS. All the tricks are roughly organized into the tabs above based on what phase of flight you might first use them.

Give this site a read, and you just may end up bookmarking it!

http://www.gamindtricks.com

Latest release of the Aviation Ad Network (20 SEP 2013)

Aviation Ad NetworkAVIATION AD NETWORK AD SERVER PLATFORM UPDATE NOTICE

We are pleased to announce the next major release of the Aviation Ad Network.  This release includes the much anticipated "Global Edition" so many of our users have been waiting for (and other great features as well).

To support our international users, we added a host of features that revolve around the international use case.  From servicing various tax centers for VAT, to changing the operating currency.
As always, we encourage all Aviation Ad Network users to review and update their advertising campaigns and publisher code implementations to this release.  You can review and update your account by logging into your Aviation Ad Network account and selecting the appropriate options.
Some of What's New in Aviation Ad Network (20 SEP 2013)

  • Support for Invoicing Advertisers - Invoices are now created with every payment received from an advertiser.  We've also added the ability to post an invoice to an advertisers account that an advertiser can then reference when wiring funds, or mailing a check / cheque.
  • Day Parting - Advertisers can select what day of the week their campaign will show. If an advertiser wants their campaign to run only on Fridays, they can do that.
  • Time Parting - Advertisers can also select what times they want their campaign to show.  If an advertiser wants their ad to show between 2PM and 5PM on Friday, and 1PM and 4PM all other days of the work week, they can do that.
  • Domain Blocking - If an advertiser is also a publisher, or if an advertiser simply does not want their advertising efforts to appear on a specific site, this feature allows Advertisers to block their ads from appearing on domain names they provide.

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